Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit #1 - Weather and Seasons

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

GPS

Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

6 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S1E1: Students will observe, measure, and communicate weather data to see patterns in weather and climate.

a.       Identify different types of weather and the characteristics of each type.

b.       Investigate weather by observing, measuring with simple instruments, and recording water data in a periodic journal or a calendar seasonally.

c.        Correlate weather data to seasonal changes.

 

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S1CS4: Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a.       Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b.       Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

 

S1CS5: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a.       Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b.       Draw grade-level appropriate pictures that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c.        Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.

 

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here: Weather and Seasons

 

HSP  Science – Chapter 2

(TE-Lesson Planner p. 42A)

·         Lesson 1 – p.44, What is Weather?

·         Lesson 2 – p.56, How Does Weather Change with Each Season?

·         Lesson 3 – p. 70, How Can We Measure Weather?

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science – pp. 14-79.

·         Watching the Weather

·         Temperature Hot or Cold

·         Air Temperature

·         Picturing Precipitation

·         The Wind Blows

                                                     

Newbridge Press Books

 

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

Weather

 

Pre-assessments: Create two word webs: one for weather words and one for seasons.

 

Project: Dress for the Weather in AIMS Earth, Physical, and Life Science, pp. 73 – 79.

 

Culminating Activity: Vote for the Best Season from pg.8 of Framework on Weather and Seasons .

 

Posttest: Fold 12” x 18” piece drawing paper into 4 rectangles. Label each section with a season; draw self performing an activity for each season. The picture should also include a tree drawn appropriate to the season.

 

 

weather

temperature

thermometer

rain gauge

wind vane

precipitation

snow

sleet

rain

hail

wind

sunny

cloudy

seasons

winter

spring

summer

autumn

fall

 


Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit # 2 - Water

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

GPS

Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

5 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S1E2: Students will observe and record changes in water as it relates to weather.

a.       Recognize changes in water when it freezes and when it melts.

b.       Identify forms of precipitation such as rain, snow, sleet, and hailstones as either solid or liquid.

c.        Determine that the weight of water before freezing, after freezing, and after melting stays the same.

d.       Determine that water in an open container disappears into the air over time, but water in a closed container does not.

 

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here:

Water

 

 

HSP Science – Chapter 3

(TE Lesson Planner p. 84A)

·         Lesson 1 – p. 86, What Are Some Forms of Precipitation?

·         Lesson 2 – p. 98, How Can Water Change?

 

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science – pp. 80-95.

·         Frosty Forms

·         Water to Ice to Water

·         A Disappearing Act

 

Newbridge Press Books

 

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

Water Experiments

 

H2O University

 

Suggested Field Trip:

Clayton County Water Authority Wetlands Center

Pre-assessment: Create a K-W-(L) chart about what they know about water.

 

Posttest Complete the “L” part of the KWL chart with the new learning, ensuring that the essential questions are answered.

 

Culminating Activity: Make a Water poster and Water book showing the characteristics of water in its different states, and the similarities and differences between ice, liquid and water vapor.

 

liquid

solid

ice

water

freeze

melt

precipitation

rain

snow

sleet

hailstone

 


Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Language Arts

First Grade

 

Light and Shadows

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

 Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

3 weeks

 

 

S1P1: Students will investigate light and sound.

a.       Recognize sources of light.

b.       Explain how shadows are formed.

 

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S1CS5: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a.       Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b.       Draw grade level appropriate pictures that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c.        Use simple pictographs and

bar graphs to communicate data.   

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here:

Light and Shadows

 

HSP Science – Chapter 4

(TE Lesson Planner p. 118A)

·         Lesson 1 – p. 120, What is Light?

 

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science – pp. 99 - 120.

·         Light Sources

·         I See the Light

·         Shadow Makers

·         Shadow Shows

 

Newbridge Press Books

 

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

·         Lights, Lights Everywhere

·         My Shadow

·         The Sun Walk

·         How the Shadows Change

·         You Are My Sunshine!

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

Light and Shadows Simulation for Kids

 

 

 

Pre-assessment: Make a word map defining light and identifying sources of light.

 

Project: Make a shadow clock. Use sidewalk chalk to trace around a pair of student’s shoes. Have one student stand in the outline while another traces the shadow cast. Label with the time drawn. Repeat the procedure hourly.  Compare the outlines for size and position. Relate findings to a sundial.

 

Posttest: Create a tri-fold booklet showing shadows created in the morning, at noon, and in late afternoon.   Explain why we don’t see shadows at night.

 

energy

light

shadows

source

 

 

 


 

Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit #4 - Sound

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

GPS

Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

5 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S1P1: Students will investigate light and sound.

c. Investigate how vibrations produce sound.

d. Differentiate between various sounds in terms of pitch (high or low) and volume (loud and soft).

b.   Identify emergency sounds and sounds that helps keep us safe.

 

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S1CS4: Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a.       Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b.       Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

 

S1CS5: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a.       Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b.       Draw grade-level appropriate pictures that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c.       Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here:

Sound

 

 

HSP Science – Chapter 4

(TE Lesson Planner p. 118A)

·         Lesson 2 – p. 132, What is Sound?

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science – pp. 121 - 157.

·         Vibration

·         Vibrations Make Sounds

·         Vibration Stations

·         The Beat of the Drum

·         Musical Bottles

·         Nailing the Pitch

·         Safety Sounds

 

Newbridge Press Books

 

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

·         Straws and Pitch Demo

·         Change In Volume

·         How Is Sound Produced?

·         High and Low Pitch

·         String Telephone

·         Sounds With Meaning

·         How Is Sound Produced?

·         The Sounds Around Us.

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

Science of Music

 

Suggested Field Trip:

Fernbank Museum of Natural History

 

Pre-assessment: How Is Sound Produced?  - pg.6 of Framework on Sound.

 

Posttest:

Writing Activity TE p. 151

 

Culminating Activity:

GRASPS activity:

Sound Bingo – pp.4-5 & 15-16

of Framework on Sound .

sound

vibrate

pitch

volume

emergency sounds

siren

alarm

 

 


 

Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit #5 - Magnets

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

 Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

4 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S1P2: Students will demonstrate effects of magnets and other magnets and other objects.

a.       Demonstrate how magnets attract and repel.

b.       Identify common objects that are attracted to a magnet.

c.        Identify objects and materials that block magnetic force.

 

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S1CS4: Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a.       Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b.       Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

 

S1CS5: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a.       Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b.       Draw grade-level appropriate pictures that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c.        Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.

 

M1P3: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

 

 

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here:

Magnets

 

HSP Science – Chapter 5

(TE Lesson Planner p. 154A)

·         Lesson 1 – p. 156, What Can a Magnet Do?

·         Lesson 2 – p. 168, What Can a Magnet Pull Through?

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science pp. 158 – 177.

·         The Upside of Magnets

·         What Will A Magnet Attract?

·         A Sorting Challenge

·         Discovery Bottle

·         Hungry Hounds

·         Painting with Magnets

·         Magnet Man

 

Newbridge Press Books

   

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

It is a Magnet song

from www.kidsknowit.com

 

 

 

Pre-assessment: Create a T-chart to record brainstorming ideas about objects that are attracted to magnets and objects that are not attracted to magnets.

 

Performance Task: Create a collage.  Fold a large sheet of construction paper in half.  Use one half to show pictures of objects that are attracted to magnets and the other half  to show objects that are not attracted to magnets.  Use pictures out of old magazines and/or draw and label objects of choice.

 

Culminating activity: GRASPS activity: pg. 6 of Framework on Magnets. Demonstrate that magnetism can act through different materials.

 

magnet

attract

repel

poles

magnetic force

 


 

Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit # 6 - Plants and Animals

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

GPS

Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

6 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S1L1: Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

a.       Identify the basic needs of a plant: Air, water, light, and nutrients.

b.       Identify the basic needs an animal: Air, water, food, shelter.

c.        Identify the parts of a plant: Root, stem, leaf, flower.

d.       Compare and describe various animals: appearance, motion, growth, basic needs.

 

S1CS7: Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a.       Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b.       In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c.        Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things that can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d.       Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them. Advantage can be taken of classroom pets.

 

GaDOE Frameworks and Performance Tasks

Click here:

Plants and Animals

 

HSP Science – Chapter 6  

(TE Lesson Planner p. 188A)

·       Lesson 1 - p. 190, What Do Plants Need?

·       Lesson 2 - p. 202, What Are the Parts of Plants?

Chapter 7

(TE Lesson Planner p. 220A)

·       Lesson 1 – p. 222, What Do Animals Need?

·       Lesson 2 – p. 234, How Can We Compare Animals?

 

AIMS First Grade Earth, Physical, and Life Science pp. 181 – 310.

·         Plant Parts

·         Observe a Leaf

·         Inside A Seed

·         Plants and Sunlight

·         What Do Plants Need?

·         Survivors

·         Caring Cubes

·         Pet Planning

·         Compare and Share

 

Newbridge Press Books

 

Websites:

www.georgiastandards.org

 

www.discoveryeducation.com

 

Steve Spangler Science-Carnations Experiment

 

Plants/Gardens

 

Suggested Field Trips:

Zoo Atlanta

Georgia Aquarium

Farm

Atlanta Botanical Gardens

Noah’s Ark

Rock Ranch

Reynolds Nature Preserve

Pre-assessments: Have students create an individual Venn Diagram identifying the basic needs of plants and animals.

 

Performance Task: Create a plant poster that displays the basic parts of the plant.

 

Posttest: What do plants and pets in a classroom need to live? Draw a picture and write your ideas.

 

 

 

light

nutrients

roots

stem

leaf

flower

air

water

food

shelter

appearance

growth

motion

basic needs

 

 


Clayton County Curriculum Guide

Elementary Science

First Grade

 

Unit # 7 - I Want to Be a Scientist

Teaching

Time

Georgia Performance

Standards Addressed

Resources

Suggested Assessment/Performance Tasks

GPS

Vocabulary

Focus

 

 

 

 

 

4 weeks

S1CS1: Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a.       Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.

 

S1CS2: Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

a.       Use whole numbers in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences.

 

S1CS3: Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

a.       Use ordinary hand tools and instruments to construct, measure, and look at objects.

b.       Make something that can actually be used to perform a task, using paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

c.        Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S1CS4: Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a.       Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b.       Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

 

S1CS5: Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a.       Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b.       Draw grade-level appropriate pictures that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c.        Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.

 

S1CS7: Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a.       Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b.       In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c.        Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things that can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d.    Much can be learned about plants

       and animals by observing them

       closely, but care must be taken to

       know the needs of living things and

      how to provide for them. Advantage

      can be taken of classroom pets. 

AIMS Earth, Physical and Life Science – appropriate pages

 

Science Projects for Grades 1-2 by Steck-Vaughn

 

www.georgiastandards.org

 

It is a Scientific Fact song

from www.kidsknowit.com

 

Suggested Fieldtrip:

Fernbank Science Center

Student Projects:  Student projects will be assessed using a rubric that places emphasis on the characteristics of being a scientist and the scientific process.

 

Project Topics:

Measuring Rain

Problem:  How much rain will fall?

Hypothesis:  One inch of rain will fall when it rains.

Materials: jar, ruler, science journal, tape, and bucket.

Observation: Record you observations.  

Conclusion: What happened? Why did I get these results? What did I learn new?

 

Plants Roots or Stems Projects

Problem: Can plants grow from roots or stems?

Hypothesis: Plants can grow from stems and roots.

Materials: sweet potato with eyes, geranium plant, tooth picks, cup of water and science journal.

Observation: Record your observations for 10 days.

Conclusion: What happened? What did you learn?

 

What Soaks up Water the Fastest?

Problem: What material soaks up water the fastest?

Hypothesis: The sponge will soak up the water fastest.

Materials: Tissue,  sponge, cardboard, felt, paper, paper towel, cotton cloth, scissors, markers, thumbtacks, piece of thin wood, beakers with equal amounts of water, stopwatches.

Observation: Perform the experiment several times to confirm/ reject results.

Conclusions: Record results of each trial. Did one material consistently absorb the water faster? Why / why not?

Can You Make a Telephone?

Problem: Can you make a telephone using everyday objects?

Hypothesis: Objects that vibrate can be used to make a telephone.

Materials: dental floss or fishing line, 3 paper clips, 2 cups, and science journal.

Observation: Perform several trials. Record you observations.

Conclusion: Did your telephone work? Why/ why not?  What did you learn new from performing this activity?

 

Light

Problem: How can you make light beams bend around a corner?

Hypothesis: Light beams can be bent by shining them at shiny surfaces, so you can see around a corner.

Materials: flashlight, small mirror, aluminum foil, black paper, cloth, and science journal.

Observation: Test the different materials. Record your observations.

Conclusion: What happened? Why/ why not? What did you learn new from performing this activity?

 

Magnets

Problem: What type of magnet is the strongest?

Hypothesis: Magnets are the same strength.

Materials: bar magnets, horseshoe magnets, circle magnets, marble magnets, and paper clips.

Observation: Test strength by observing how many paper clips are picked up by each type of magnet.

Conclusion: Compare your results. Which magnet picked up the most paper clips? Why/ why not? What did you learn new from performing this activity?