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Tracy Colter


Tracy Colter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, but was raised in Mount Pleasant South Carolina, 10 minutes from Charleston. She graduated from Grambling State University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology in 1998. She started working as a Special Education Paraprofessional with Eagles Woods Academy where she became one of the school’s Student Behavior Management Specialist. Her primary role was working with students on appropriate classroom behavior and teaching social skills as an alternative to In School Suspension. She left Dekalb County in 2005.

In 2007, Tracy started working at Church Street Elementary as a paraprofessional in the Pre-K-2nd grade Autism classroom. It was during her 2.5 years in this classroom she completed a Teacher Preparation program through University of Phoenix while earning a Masters’ in Special Education. In 2010, she started as a Special Education Teacher at Charles Drew High School where she taught Social Studies and English/Language Arts. Tracy left Drew High School in 2016 and moved to Pointe South Middle School as the Special Education Department Chair while teaching 6th-8th grade Social Studies and 8th grade ELA. While at Pointe South Middle School, Tracy earned a Specialist in Educational Leadership from Columbus State University. In 2019, Tracy became a Lead Teacher of Special Education supporting teachers and students of Morrow High School. During this time, she received the Coaching Endorsement.

Tracy now serves as Teacher Development Specialist supporting TAPP teachers while providing professional development to new and veteran Special Education teachers in Clayton County Public Schools.

Favorite Quote:
“People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”
Theodore Roosevelt